Introducing the Stoned Goat Knife

January 17, 2023

Six MKC Stoned Goat blades with varying paracord handle colors lie at an angle on a dark background.

Ever since launch day, we’ve received incredible feedback on our Speedgoat Knife.

Our buyers love the Speedgoat’s crazy-light weight and adaptability. It’s a blade that can do just about everything — caping, gutting, skinning, deboning, and so much more — without weighing you down when you’re out in the field.

But some of our customers wish the tip wasn’t so pointy. The Speedgoat is a little longer than they need a skinner-style blade to be and has more point than they want.

That’s perfectly understandable in a hunting context. For example, when opening up an animal, there’s always the chance a pointy tip will poke at the guts, which you don’t want to happen.

Customers asked me, “Does MKC have a blade that looks like the Stonewall but in a Speedgoat size?”

We didn’t at the time — but I thought, “Why don’t we just marry the two?”

Thus, our Stoned Goat Knife was born!

What’s Special About the Stoned Goat Knife?

Most ultralight knives on the market, at least that I’ve seen, don’t have a skinner-style blade.

There are skinning knives that claim to be ultralight, but they lack the belly of a real skinning knife. The ones that do have that belly are too thick and too heavy to be considered ultralight.

But the blade on the Stoned Goat is super thin. Like the Speedgoat, it comes in at just 100 thousandths thick, down to 10 thousandths thick at the edge.

In fact, the Stoned Goat is very similar to the Speedgoat. The handle of the Stoned Goat feels identical to the Speedgoat in the hand, and both are wrapped with a convenient length of functional paracord. From the MKC logo all the way down to the end of the handle, nothing is different. If you have a Speedgoat, you already know what the Stoned Goat feels like.

The difference, of course, is the blade.

Infographic: Introducing the Stoned Goat Knife

Specs and Design Features

Length

The front of the Stoned Goat’s handle — the forward-most part of the paracord — to the tip of the blade is 3 ¾". The overall length of the knife is 7 ¾", which is the same as the Speedgoat.

Steel, Blade Thickness, and Edge Geometry

The Stoned Goat uses 52100 carbon alloy steel. The blade is .095" thick, and a bit shorter than a Speedgoat. The edge geometry is .010 (ten thousandths), which is super thin, and sharpened at a 15-degree angle. An angle that thin is very easy to resharpen to an aggressive, working edge.

Weight

The weight of the Stoned Goat without the sheath is 1.9 oz. With the sheath, it’s 4.1 oz. More on that below.

Handle

Like the Speedgoat, the Stoned Goat’s handle is wrapped in seven feet of paracord, which you can unwind and use in many different ways. We also skeletonized the handle inside to get rid of unnecessary weight.

Again, from the MKC logo to the end of the handle, there is no difference between the Stoned Goat and the beloved Speedgoat.

Blade Shape

The Stoned Goat’s blade is more of a drop point skinner shape. It’s very similar to the Stonewall Skinner in that it takes an upward trajectory coming off the handle before dipping into a drop point.

This puts the edge of the blade in a much better position to be used as a skinner.

Belly

The belly of the Stoned Goat is similar to the belly of the Stonewall. This is where 99% of the work gets done on a skinning knife.

We intentionally designed the Stoned Goat to provide more edge and less point. This reduces a hunter’s likelihood of puncturing guts and enables them to take longer strokes and get more work done on an animal.

Our New Sheath

Our new sheath has a modular clip design that can rotate 90 degrees. The added holes and slots at the top and bottom allow you to add aftermarket clips, tie a paracord, hang the knife around your neck, tie it to a pack, etc. The clip can even be removed, allowing you to tuck the blade inside a vinyl harness or something similar.

The sheath has an adjustable tension screw, allowing you to modify the tension to your liking and prevent loss.

The sheath has a hole at the tip to drain any water or blood that runs inside, making it easy to clean the sheath and get rid of debris.

Our special belt loop clip allows you to put the sheath over your belt without having to take your belt off, or over a backpack strap or MOLLE webbing.

The Stoned Goat: Final Thoughts

The Stoned Goat is a great solution for the ambitious backpack hunter who anticipates taking down an animal and skinning it.

Despite the modifications for skinning, the knife still has enough of a tip on it to cape in the field — because I would never send someone on a backpack hunt without the ability to cape out an animal.

We’re really excited about this knife. It does everything the Speedgoat does, but with a more versatile skinning design on the edge. I can’t wait to hear stories from knife owners who take the Stoned Goat along the next time they’re in the field.

Happy hunting!

 

by Josh Smith, Master Bladesmith and Founder of Montana Knife Company

 






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